Increase your self-reliance by building good, nutrient-rich soil through backyard composting. Collecting your yard material and kitchen scraps at home provides the opportunity to build soil for use on plants, vegetables, and flowers indoors and out.

Benefits of Composting
  • Improves soil
  • Reduces watering
  • Builds stronger plants
  • Uses less pesticides
  • Reduces hauling costs
  • Sequesters carbon
  • Sustains water quality
  • Increases local self-reliance
  • Saves money
  • Helps the planet
  • Is easy to manage

Compost Bin Sale

2020 COMPOST BINS - LIMITED SUPPLY STILL AVAILABLE
Contact the Land Conservation Office to schedule your pick-up time.
(715)627-6292

ONLY $55 - Valued at $100

Limited quantities available - contact the Land Conservation Office and pre-order your composter to be guaranteed availability.
Bins will be available on the day of the event on a first-come, first-served basis until they are gone.

Key Features of the Home Composter:Recommended by expert composters
Made of 100% recycled plastic
Black to absorb heat quickly
Easy to assemble
Holds six to eight 30-gallon bags of yard material
Long lasting
Comes with “The Composting Cookbook”
Not available in storesQuestions on how to get started as a backyard composter? Contact your location Land Conservation Department or your UW Madison, Division of Extension, Langlade County Educator for guidance.
 
Backyard Composting: Getting Started
There are many different ways to make a compost pile. Helpful tools include pitchforks, shovels, and water hoses with a spray head. Regular mixing or turning of the compost and some water will help maintain the compost.

All composting requires three basic ingredients:
  • Browns - This includes materials such as dead leaves, branches, and twigs.
  • Greens - This includes materials such as grass clippings, vegetable waste, fruit scraps, and coffee grounds.
  • Water - Having the right amount of water is important for compost development. The compost should be as damp as a well rung out sponge.
Your compost pile should have about two parts browns to one part greens. Alternating layers of materials is a good strategy for getting your compost going. The brown materials provide carbon for your compost, the green materials provide nitrogen, and the water provides moisture to help break down the organic matter.

You can build your own compost bin with materials you may have in your garage/shed. Click on the links below to see plans for building a simple bin.